Thalassemia

THALASSEMIA MAJOR. Thalassemia is a genetic disease. Thalassemia Major is present at birth, and the child cannot outgrow it. Thalassemia cannot be 'contracted'. It is not infectious or contagious. Both parents need to have Thalassemia trait in order for the child to contract it. If a person with a Thalassemia trait marries another such person, the offspring has a 25% chance of developing full blown Thalassemia. If only one parent has the trait, the trait may be passed on to the child. A person with a Thalassemia trait shows no symptoms except perhaps for anaemia. Iron supplements don't help, and should not be taken. Having a Thalassemia trait does not make a person susceptible to any diseases. This trait does not harm the person in any way, and the person can live a perfectly normal life without even being aware that he has a Thalassemia trait. A Thalassemia trait will NOT develop into the full blown disease at any stage in life. Thalassemia Minor What is the difference between thalassemia minor and major? There are two forms of beta thalassemia. They are thalassemia minor and thalassemia major (which is also called Cooley's anemia). Thalassemia minor: The individual with thalassemia minor has only one copy of the beta thalassemia gene (together with one perfectly normal beta-chain gene). The person is said to be heterozygous for beta thalassemia. Persons with thalassemia minor have (at most) mild anemia (with slight lowering of the hemoglobin level in the blood). This situation can very closely resemble that with mild iron-deficiency anemia. However, persons with thalassemia minor have a normal blood iron level (unless they have are iron deficient for other reasons). No treatment is necessary for thalassemia minor. In particular, iron is neither necessary nor advised. Thalassemia Minor often coexists with other diseases such as asthma, and mood disorders I am 25yrs old and suffreing from Tha Thalassemia major Thalassemia is a genetic disease. Thalassemia Major is present at birth, and the child cannot outgrow it. Thalassemia cannot be 'contracted'. It is not infectious or contagious. Both parents need to have Thalassemia trait in order for the child to contract it. If a person with a Thalassemia trait marries another such person, the offspring has a 25% chance of developing full blown Thalassemia. If only one parent has the trait, the trait may be passed on to the child. A person with a Thalassemia trait shows no symptoms except perhaps for anaemia. Iron supplements don't help, and should not be taken. Having a Thalassemia trait does not make a person susceptible to any diseases. This trait does not harm the person in any way, and the person can live a perfectly normal life without even being aware that he has a Thalassemia trait. A Thalassemia trait will NOT develop into the full blown disease at any stage in life. Thalassemia Minor What is the difference between Thalassemia minor and major? There are two forms of beta Thalassemia. They are Thalassemia minor and Thalassemia major (which is also called Cooley's anemia). Thalassemia minor: The individual with Thalassemia minor has only one copy of the beta Thalassemia gene (together with one perfectly normal beta-chain gene). The person is said to be heterozygous for beta Thalassemia. Persons with Thalassemia minor have (at most) mild anemia (with slight lowering of the hemoglobin level in the blood). This situation can very closely resemble that with mild iron-deficiency anemia. However, persons with Thalassemia minor have a normal blood iron level (unless they have are iron deficient for other reasons). No treatment is necessary for Thalassemia minor. In particular, iron is neither necessary nor advised. Thalassemia Minor often coexists with other diseases such as asthma, and mood disorders I am 25yrs old and suffreing from Thalassemia Minor. My hemoglobin count is 7grms ...We both (my husband & me) want to have a baby and we are trying from couple of months but not yet succeeded.Is Thalassemia is the reason for not getting pregnant?? Don't worry about it because 1 in 4 people have chances of baby it means 25%you have chance. In Thalassemia minor, the hemoglobin genes are inherited during conception, one from the mother (egg) and one from the father (sperm). People with a Thalassemia trait in one gene are known as carriers or are said to have Thalassemia minor. The only way to know if you carry the Thalassemia trait is to have a special blood test called hemoglobin electrophoresis which can identify the gene. The carriers of Thalassemia minor become anemic or slightly anemic. If you, your parents, or ancestors are from 'Thalassemia regions' (identified in What is Thal), request a test from your doctor. It is vitally important to identify yourself as a possible carrier of Thalassemia minor. Possessing the Thalassemia minor trait gives you a 25%, (1 in 4) chance of having a baby with Thalassemia major, providing that both parents of the child are both carriers of the disorder. Increased awareness is the key to prevention. THALASSEMIA Thalassemia (from θάλασσα, thalassa, sea + αἷμα, haima, blood British spelling, "thalassaemia") is an inherited autosomal recessive blood disease. In thalassemia, the genetic defect results in reduced rate of synthesis of one of the globin chains that make up hemoglobin. Reduced synthesis of one of the globin chains can cause the formation of abnormal hemoglobin molecules, thus causing anemia, the characteristic presenting symptom of the thalassemias. Thalassemia is a quantitative problem of too few globins synthesized, whereas sickle-cell anemia (a hemoglobinopathy) is a qualitative problem of synthesis of an incorrectly functioning globin. Thalassemias usually result in underproduction of normal globin proteins, often through mutations in regulatory genes. Hemoglobinopathies imply structural abnormalities in the globin proteins themselves.[1] The two conditions may overlap, however, since some conditions which cause abnormalitiGenetic prevalence Thalassemia has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance α and β thalassemia are often inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion although this is not always the case. Cases of dominantly inherited α and β thalassemias have been reported, the first of which was in an Irish family who had a two deletions of 4 and 11 bp in exon 3 interrupted by an insertion of 5 bp in the β-globin gene. For the autosomal recessive forms of the disease both parents must be carriers in order for a child to be affected. If both parents carry a hemoglobinopathy trait, there is a 25% chance with each pregnancy for an affected child. Genetic counseling and genetic testing is recommended for families that carry a thalassemia trait. There are an estimated 60-80 million people in the world who carry the beta thalassemia trait alone. This is a very rough estimate and the actual number of thalassemia Major patients is unknown due to the prevalence of thalassemia in less developed countries in the Middle East and Asia where genetic screening resources are limited. Countries such as India, Pakistan and Iran are seeing a large increase of thalassemia patients due to lack of genetic counseling and screening. There is growing concern that thalassemia may become a very serious problem in the next 50 years, one that will burden the world's blood bank supplies and the health system in general. There are an estimated 1,000 people living with Thalassemia Major in the United States and an unknown number of carriers. Because of the prevalence of the disease in countries with little knowledge of thalassemia, access to proper treatment and diagnosis can be difficult. As with other genetically acquired disorders, genetic counseling is recommended.es in globin proteins (hemoglobinopathy) also affect their production (thalassemia). Thus, some thalassemias are hemoglobinopathies, but most are not. Either or both of these conditions may cause anemia. The disease is particularly prevalent among Mediterranean people, and this geographical association was responsible for its naming: Thalassa (θάλασσα) is Greek for the sea, Haema (αἷμα) is Greek for blood. In Europe, the highest concentrations of the disease are found in Greece and in parts of Italy, in particular, Southern Italy and the lower Po valley. The major Mediterranean islands (except the Balearics) such as Sicily, Sardinia, Malta, Corsica, Cyprus and Crete are heavily affected in particular. Other Mediterranean people, as well as those in the vicinity of the Mediterranean, also have high rates of thalassemia, including Middle Easterners and North Africans. Far from the Mediterranean, South Asians are also affected, with the world's highest concentration of carriers (18% of the population) being in the Maldives.

AYURVEDIC TREATMENT: THEY PROVIDE FULL AND SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR THIS PROBLEM. IN THIS THEY PROVIDE HERBAL MEDICINE LIKE POWDER, PILLS, AND KWATH (LIQUID) AND OIL FOR MASSAGE. THEY DO TAKE CARE ABOUT BLOOD PRESSURE AND DIGESTION AND URINE SYSTEM OF THE PATIENT. THERE IS NO SIDE EFFECT FOR THIS AYURVEDIC TREATMENT. TO START THE TREATMENT THEY NEED FULL DETAIL AND INFORMATION ABOUT THE PATIENT. IF POSSIBLE DO SEND THEM MEDICAL AND LAB REPORT RELATED TO PATIENT. THEY JUST MANUFACTURE THE MEDICINES IN THEIR OWN MANUFACTURING UNIT. THEY PROVIDE THE MEDICINES TO THEIR PATIENT ONLY IT’S NOT FOR COMMERCIAL BASIS.

©2019 by Benaras International. ABN 967 908 852 66

Terms & Policy

Career With Us

Contact Us